Wednesday, June 24, 2009

Fun with Photoshop Filters

Photo of Cadillac in Jack's Auto Ranch with Photoshop filter applied - copyright 2009 Jeffery Blackwell



I read this blog about "tilt/shift" lenses and it inspired this collection of images.

(NOTE TO NEW READERS: This post is considerably more photo-geeky than normal. Enjoy the images, but feel free to scroll down for more representative topics ;-)

"Tilt/shift" is a photographic technique where the "film" plane is tilted and/or shifted out of its standard position parallel to, and centered behind, the lens. The effect of tilting the "film" is that the area of the image that is in focus slices through the scene at an angle. (The effect of shifting the film can compensate for perspective when doing architectural photos, for example.)




Photo of vintage race car at Elkhart Lake, WI Road America with Photoshop filter applied - copyright 2009 Jeffery Blackwell




Photo of Brad Mueller late model stock car at Slinger Speedway, Slinger, WI Road America with Photoshop filter applied - copyright 2009 Jeffery Blackwell



These images were not produced by a tilt/shift lens, but rather using a selective mask and a Photoshop filter called "Lens Blur".

Once I got going, I tried combining this technique with some other filter effects.




Photo of a vintage race car at Elkhart Lake, WI Road America with Photoshop filter applied - copyright 2009 Jeffery Blackwell



Photo of a vintage race car at Elkhart Lake, WI Road America with Photoshop filter applied - copyright 2009 Jeffery Blackwell




Anyway, the effect can be used to control the viewer's eye, which naturally gravitates to the the sharpest area of a photo. The effect can be either subtle or quite dramatic.

It has another effect which is quite interesting. Because your brain has been trained by looking at so many photographs, sometimes it will interpret the subjects in images like this as being very small - or toylike. (This is because when you photograph something very small, the depth of field - the area in focus - tends to be very shallow.)

I am pretty straight when it comes to photography, I usually keep my processing to correcting contrast levels and cropping. This was fun and I think some of the images are quite interesting...




Photo of a vintage Chevrolet Deluxe with Photoshop filter applied - copyright 2009 Jeffery Blackwell




All words and images copyright 2009 Jeffery Blackwell

2 comments:

  1. Great information shared through this post. Thanks.

    Regards,
    photoshop masking

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thanks, SBL.

    I was actually surprised at how powerful this technique is. After doing a search, I learned that tilt-shift (real and faked) is actually a very popular technique right now.

    It does allow you to neutralize unfortunate backgrounds. The image of the blue and orange race car, for example, had some very distracting elements which were unavoidable when I made the photo. With the selective blurring, it's a decent image.

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Thanks for commenting! Double clutch!!